Categories
imported-hardwood

Balau (Shorea)

Balau is an imported hardwood

Location

Balau, red balau, and selangan batu constitute a group of species that are the heaviest of the 200 Shorea species. About 45 species of this group grow from Sri Lanka and southern India through southeast Asia to the Philippines.

Characteristics

The heartwood is light to deep red or purple-brown, and it is fairly distinct from the lighter and yellowish- to reddishor purplish-brown sapwood. The texture is moderately fine to coarse, and the grain is often interlocked. The wood weighs more than 750 kg/m3 (47 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. Balau is a heavy, hard, and strong timber that dries slowly with moderate to severe end checks and splits. The heartwood is durable to moderately durable and very resistant to preservative treatments.

Primary Uses

Balau is used for heavy construction, frames of boats, decking, flooring, and utility furniture.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Balata (Manilkara bidentata)

Balata is an imported hardwood

Location

Balata or bulletwood (Manilkara bidentata) is widely distributed throughout the West Indies, Central America, and northern South America.

Characteristics

The heartwood of balata is light to dark reddish brown and not sharply demarcated from the pale brown sapwood. Texture is fine and uniform, and the grain is straight to occasionally wavy or interlocked. Balata is a strong and very heavy wood; density of air-dried wood is 1,060 kg/m3 (66 lb/ft3). It is generally difficult to air dry, with a tendency to develop severe checking and warp. The wood is moderately easy to work despite its high density, and it is rated good to excellent in all machining operations. Balata is very resistant to attack by decay fungi and highly resistant to subterranean termites but only moderately resistant to dry-wood termites.

Primary Uses

Balata is suitable for heavy construction, textile and pulpmill equipment, furniture parts, turnery, tool handles, flooring, boat frames and other bentwork, railroad crossties, violin bows, billiard cues, and other specialty uses.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Azobe (Lophira alata)

Azobe is an imported hardwood

Location

Azobe or ekki (Lophira alata) is found in West Africa and extends into the Congo basin.

Characteristics

The heartwood is dark red, chocolate-brown, or purple- brown with conspicuous white deposits in the pores (vessels). The texture is coarse, and the grain is usually interlocked. The wood is strong, and its density averages about 1,120 kg/m3 (70 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. It is very difficult to work with hand and machine tools, and tools are severely blunted if the wood is machined when dry. Azobe can be dressed to a smooth finish, and gluing properties are usually good. Drying is very difficult without excessive degrade. The heartwood is rated as very durable against decay but only moderately resistant to termite attack. Azobe is very resistant to acid and has good weathering properties. It is also resistant to teredo attack. The heartwood is extremely resistant to preservative treatment.

Primary Uses

Azobe is excellent for heavy construction work, harbor construction, heavy-duty flooring, and railroad crossties.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Avodire (Turraeanthus africanus)

Avodire is an imported hardwood

Location

Avodire (Turraeanthus africanus) has a rather extensive range in Africa, from Sierra Leone westward to the Congo region and southward to Zaire and Angola. It is most common in the eastern region of the Ivory Coast and is scattered elsewhere. Avodire is a medium-size tree of the rainforest where it forms fairly dense but localized and discontinuous timber stands.

Characteristics

The wood is cream to pale yellow with high natural luster; it eventually darkens to a golden yellow. The grain is sometimes straight but more often wavy or irregularly interlocked, which produces an unusual and attractive mottled figure when sliced or cut on the quarter. Although avodire weighs less than northern red oak (Quercus rubra), it has almost identical strength properties except that it is lower in shock resistance and shear. The wood works fairly easily with hand and machine tools and finishes well in most operations.

Primary Uses

Figured material is usually converted into veneer for use in decorative work, and it is this kind of material that is chiefly imported into the United States. Other uses include furniture, fine joinery, cabinetwork, and paneling.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Angelique (Dicorynia guianensis)

Angelique is an imported hardwood

Location

Angelique (Dicorynia guianensis) comes from French Guiana and Suriname.

Characteristics

Because of the variability in heartwood color between different trees, two forms are commonly recognized by producers. The heartwood that is russet-colored when freshly cut and becomes superficially dull brown with a purplish cast is referred to as “gris.” The heartwood that is more distinctly reddish and frequently shows wide purplish bands is called “angelique rouge.” The texture of the wood is somewhat coarser than that of black walnut (Juglans nigra), and the grain is generally straight or slightly interlocked. In strength, angelique is superior to teak (Tectona grandis) and white oak (Quercus alba), when green or air dry, in all properties except tension perpendicular to grain. Angelique is rated as highly resistant to decay and resistant to marine borer attack. Machining properties vary and may be due to differences in density, moisture content, and silica content. After the wood is thoroughly air or kiln dried, it can be worked effectively only with carbide-tipped tools.

Primary Uses

The strength and durability of angelique make it especially suitable for heavy construction, harbor installations, bridges, heavy planking for pier and platform decking, and railroad bridge ties. The wood is also suitable for ship decking, planking, boat frames, industrial flooring, and parquet blocks and strips.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Andiroba (Carapa guianensis)

Andiroba is an imported hardwood

Location

Because of the widespread distribution of andiroba (Carapa guianensis) in tropical America, the wood is known under a variety of names, including cedro macho, carapa, crabwood, and tangare. These names are also applied to the related species Carapa nicaraguensis, whose properties are generally inferior to those of C. guianensis.

Characteristics

The heartwood varies from medium to dark reddish brown. The texture is like that of true mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), and andiroba is sometimes substituted for true mahogany. The grain is usually interlocked but is rated easy to work, paint, and glue. The wood is rated as durable to very durable with respect to decay and insects. Andiroba is heavier than true mahogany and accordingly is markedly superior in all static bending properties, compression parallel to grain, hardness, shear, and durability.

Primary Uses

On the basis of its properties, andiroba appears to be suited for such uses as flooring, frame construction in the tropics, furniture and cabinetwork, millwork, utility and decorative veneer, and plywood.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Albarco (Cariniana)

Albarco is an imported hardwood

Location

Albarco, or jequitiba as it is known in Brazil, is the common name applied to species in the genus Cariniana. The 10 species are distributed from eastern Peru and northern Bolivia through central Brazil to Venezuela and Colombia. The heartwood is reddish or purplish brown and sometimes has dark streaks. It is usually not sharply demarcated from the pale brown sapwood. The texture is medium and the grain straight to interlocked. Albarco can be worked satisfactorily with only slight blunting of tool cutting edges because of the presence of silica. Veneer can be cut without difficulty.

Characteristics

The wood is rather strong and moderately heavy, weighing about 560 kg/m3 (35 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. In general, the wood has about the same strength as that of U.S. oaks (Quercus spp.). The heartwood is durable, particularly the deeply colored material. It has good resistance to drywood termite attack.

Primary Uses

Albarco is primarily used for general construction and carpentry wood, but it can also be used for furniture components, shipbuilding, flooring, veneer for plywood, and turnery.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Afrormosia (Pericopsis elata)

Afrormosia is an imported hardwood

Location

Afrormosia or kokrodua (Pericopsis elata), a large West African tree, is sometimes used as a substitute for teak (Tectona grandis).

Characteristics

The heartwood is fine textured, with straight to interlocked grain. The wood is brownish yellow with darker streaks and moderately hard and heavy, weighing about 700 kg/m3 (43 lb/ft3) at 15% moisture content. The wood strongly resembles teak in appearance but lacks its oily nature and has a different texture. The wood dries readily with little degrade and has good dimensional stability. It is somewhat heavier and stronger than teak. The heartwood is highly resistant to decay fungi and termite attack and is extremely durable under adverse conditions.

Primary Uses

Afrormosia is often used for the same purposes as teak, such as boat construction, joinery, flooring, furniture, interior woodwork, and decorative veneer.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.