Categories
domestic-hardwood

Ash, White Group (Fraxinus americana, F. pennsylvanica, F. quadrangulata, F. latifolia)

Ash, White Group is a domestic hardwood

Important species of the white ash group are American white ash (Fraxinus americana), green ash (F. pennsylvanica), blue ash (F. quadrangulata), and Oregon ash (F. latifolia). The first three species grow in the eastern half of the United States. Oregon ash grows along the Pacific Coast.

Characteristics

The heartwood of the white ash group is brown, and the sapwood is light-colored or nearly white. Second-growth trees are particularly sought after because of the inherent qualities of the wood from these trees: it is heavy, strong, hard, and stiff, and it has high resistance to shock. Oregon ash has somewhat lower strength properties than American white ash, but it is used for similar purposes on the West Coast.

Primary Uses

American white ash is used principally for nonstriking tool handles, oars, baseball bats, and other sporting and athletic goods. For handles of the best grade, some handle specifications call for not less than 2 nor more than 7 growth rings per centimeter (not less than 5 nor more than 17 growth rings per inch). The additional weight requirement of 690 kg/m3 (43 lb/ft3) or more at 12% moisture content ensures high quality material. Principal uses for the white ash group are decorative veneer, cabinets, furniture, flooring, millwork, and crates.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
domestic-hardwood

Ash, Black Group (F. nigra, F. profunda)

Ash, Black Group is a domestic hardwood

Location

The black ash group includes black ash (F. nigra) and pumpkin ash (F. profunda). Black ash grows in the Northeast and Midwest, and pumpkin ash in the South.

Characteristics

The heartwood of black ash is a darker brown than that of American white ash; the sapwood is light-colored or nearly white. The wood of the black ash group is lighter in weight (basic specific gravity of 0.45 to 0.48) than that of the white ash group (>0.50). Pumpkin ash, American white ash, and green ash that grow in southern river bottoms, especially in areas frequently flooded for long periods, produce buttresses that contain relatively lightweight and brash wood.

Primary Uses

Principal uses for the black ash group are decorative veneer, cabinets, millwork, furniture, cooperage, and crates.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
domestic-hardwood

Alder, Red (Alnus rubra)

Alder, Red is a domestic hardwood

Red alder (Alnus rubra) grows along the Pacific coast between Alaska and California. It is the principal hardwood for commercial manufacture of wood products in Oregon and Washington and the most abundant commercial hardwood species in these two states.

Characteristics

The wood of red alder varies from almost white to pale pinkish brown, and there is no visible boundary between heartwood and sapwood. Red alder is moderately light in weight and intermediate in most strength properties but low in shock resistance. It has relatively low shrinkage.

Primary Uses

The principal use of red alder is for furniture, but it is also used for sash and door panel stock and other millwork.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Pine, Radiata (Pinus radiata)

Pine, Radiata is an imported softwood

Location

Radiata pine (Pinus radiata), also known as Monterey pine, is planted extensively in the southern hemisphere, mainly in Chile, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa. Plantationgrown trees may reach a height of 26 to 30 m (80 to 90 ft) in 20 years.

Characteristics

The heartwood from plantation-grown trees is light brown to pinkish brown and is distinct from the paler cream-colored sapwood. Growth rings are primarily wide and distinct. False rings may be common. The texture is moderately even and fine, and the grain is not interlocked. Plantation-grown radiata pine averages about 480 kg/m3 (30 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. Its strength is comparable with that of red pine (P. resinosa), although location and growth rate may cause considerable variation in strength properties. The wood air or kiln dries rapidly with little degrade. The wood machines easily although the grain tends to tear around large knots. Radiata pine nails and glues easily, and it takes paint and finishes well. The sapwood is prone to attack by stain fungi and vulnerable to boring insects. However, plantationgrown stock is mostly sapwood, which treats readily with preservatives. The heartwood is rated as durable above ground and is moderately resistant to preservative treatment.

Primary Uses

Radiata pine can be used for the same purposes as are the other pines grown in the United States. These uses include veneer, plywood, pulp, fiberboard, construction, boxes, and millwork.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.