Categories
imported-softwood

Pine, Ocote (Pinus oocarpa)

Pine, Ocote is an imported softwood

Location

Ocote pine (Pinus oocarpa) is a high-elevation species that occurs from northwestern Mexico southward through Guatemala into Nicaragua. The largest and most extensive stands occur in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Honduras. The sapwood is a pale yellowish brown and generally up to 7 cm (3 in.) wide. The heartwood is a light reddish brown. The grain is not interlocked. The wood has a resinous odor, and it weighs about 656 kg/m3 (41 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. The strength properties of ocote pine are comparable in most respects with those of longleaf pine (P. palustris).

Characteristics

Decay resistance studies have shown ocote pine heartwood to be very durable with respect to white-rot fungal attack and moderately durable with respect to brown rot.

Primary Uses

Ocote pine is comparable with the southern pines (Pinus) in workability and machining characteristics. It is a general construction wood suited for the same uses as are the southern pines.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Pine, Caribbean (Pinus caribaea)

Pine, Caribbean is an imported softwood

Location

Caribbean pine (Pinus caribaea) occurs along the Caribbean side of Central America from Belize to northeastern Nicaragua. It is also native to the Bahamas and Cuba. This low-elevation tree is widely introduced as a plantation species throughout the world tropics.

Characteristics

The heartwood is golden- to red-brown and distinct from the sapwood, which is light yellow and roughly 2 to 5 cm (1 to 2 in.) wide. This softwood species has a strong resinous odor and a greasy feel. The weight varies considerably and may range from 416 to 817 kg/m3 (26 to 51 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. Caribbean pine may be appreciably heavier than slash pine (P. elliottii), but the mechanical properties of these two species are rather similar. The lumber can be kiln dried satisfactorily. Caribbean pine is easy to work in all machining operations, but its high resin content may cause resin to accumulate on the equipment. Durability and resistance to insect attack vary with resin content; in general, the heartwood is rated as moderately durable. The sapwood is highly permeable and is easily treated by open tank or pressure- vacuum systems. The heartwood is rated as moderately resistant to preservative treatment, depending on resin content.

Primary Uses

Caribbean pine is used for the same purposes as are the southern pines (Pinus spp.).

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Parana Pine (Araucaria angustifolia)

Parana Pine is an imported softwood

Location

The wood commonly called parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia) is a softwood but not a true pine. It grows in southeastern Brazil and adjacent areas of Paraguay and Argentina.

Characteristics

Parana pine has many desirable characteristics. It is available in large-size clear boards with uniform texture. The small pinhead knots (leaf traces) that appear on flat-sawn surfaces and the light or reddish-brown heartwood provide a desirable figure for matching in paneling and interior woodwork. Growth rings are fairly distinct and similar to those of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). The grain is not interlocked, and the wood takes paint well, glues easily, and is free from resin ducts, pitch pockets, and pitch streaks. Density of air-dried wood averages 545 kg/m3 (34 lb/ft3). The strength of parana pine compares favorably with that of U.S. softwood species of similar density and, in some cases, approaches that of species with higher density. Parana pine is especially strong in shear strength, hardness, and nail-holding ability, but it is notably deficient in strength in compression across the grain. The tendency of the kiln-dried wood to split and warp is caused by the presence of compression wood, an abnormal type of wood with intrinsically large shrinkage along the grain. Boards containing compression wood should be excluded from exacting uses.

Primary Uses

The principal uses of parana pine include framing lumber, interior woodwork, sashes and door stock, furniture case goods, and veneer.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Cypress, Mexican (Cupressus lusitanica)

Cypress, Mexican is an imported softwood

Location

Native to Mexico and Guatemala, Mexican cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) is now widely planted at high elevations throughout the tropical world.

Characteristics

The heartwood is yellowish, pale brown, or pinkish, with occasional streaking or variegation. The texture is fine and uniform, and the grain is usually straight. The wood is fragrantly scented. The density of air-dried wood is 512 kg/m3 (32 lb/ft3), and the strength is comparable with that of yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) or western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). The wood is easy to work with hand and machine tools, and it nails, stains, and polishes well. Mexican cypress air dries very rapidly with little or no end- or surface-checking. Reports on durability are conflicting. The heartwood is not treatable by the open tank process and seems to have an irregular response to pressure- vacuum systems.

Primary Uses

Mexican cypress is used mainly for posts and poles, furniture components, and general construction.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Pine, Radiata (Pinus radiata)

Pine, Radiata is an imported softwood

Location

Radiata pine (Pinus radiata), also known as Monterey pine, is planted extensively in the southern hemisphere, mainly in Chile, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa. Plantationgrown trees may reach a height of 26 to 30 m (80 to 90 ft) in 20 years.

Characteristics

The heartwood from plantation-grown trees is light brown to pinkish brown and is distinct from the paler cream-colored sapwood. Growth rings are primarily wide and distinct. False rings may be common. The texture is moderately even and fine, and the grain is not interlocked. Plantation-grown radiata pine averages about 480 kg/m3 (30 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. Its strength is comparable with that of red pine (P. resinosa), although location and growth rate may cause considerable variation in strength properties. The wood air or kiln dries rapidly with little degrade. The wood machines easily although the grain tends to tear around large knots. Radiata pine nails and glues easily, and it takes paint and finishes well. The sapwood is prone to attack by stain fungi and vulnerable to boring insects. However, plantationgrown stock is mostly sapwood, which treats readily with preservatives. The heartwood is rated as durable above ground and is moderately resistant to preservative treatment.

Primary Uses

Radiata pine can be used for the same purposes as are the other pines grown in the United States. These uses include veneer, plywood, pulp, fiberboard, construction, boxes, and millwork.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.