Categories
imported-softwood

Pine, Ocote (Pinus oocarpa)

Pine, Ocote is an imported softwood

Location

Ocote pine (Pinus oocarpa) is a high-elevation species that occurs from northwestern Mexico southward through Guatemala into Nicaragua. The largest and most extensive stands occur in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Honduras. The sapwood is a pale yellowish brown and generally up to 7 cm (3 in.) wide. The heartwood is a light reddish brown. The grain is not interlocked. The wood has a resinous odor, and it weighs about 656 kg/m3 (41 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. The strength properties of ocote pine are comparable in most respects with those of longleaf pine (P. palustris).

Characteristics

Decay resistance studies have shown ocote pine heartwood to be very durable with respect to white-rot fungal attack and moderately durable with respect to brown rot.

Primary Uses

Ocote pine is comparable with the southern pines (Pinus) in workability and machining characteristics. It is a general construction wood suited for the same uses as are the southern pines.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Pine, Caribbean (Pinus caribaea)

Pine, Caribbean is an imported softwood

Location

Caribbean pine (Pinus caribaea) occurs along the Caribbean side of Central America from Belize to northeastern Nicaragua. It is also native to the Bahamas and Cuba. This low-elevation tree is widely introduced as a plantation species throughout the world tropics.

Characteristics

The heartwood is golden- to red-brown and distinct from the sapwood, which is light yellow and roughly 2 to 5 cm (1 to 2 in.) wide. This softwood species has a strong resinous odor and a greasy feel. The weight varies considerably and may range from 416 to 817 kg/m3 (26 to 51 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. Caribbean pine may be appreciably heavier than slash pine (P. elliottii), but the mechanical properties of these two species are rather similar. The lumber can be kiln dried satisfactorily. Caribbean pine is easy to work in all machining operations, but its high resin content may cause resin to accumulate on the equipment. Durability and resistance to insect attack vary with resin content; in general, the heartwood is rated as moderately durable. The sapwood is highly permeable and is easily treated by open tank or pressure- vacuum systems. The heartwood is rated as moderately resistant to preservative treatment, depending on resin content.

Primary Uses

Caribbean pine is used for the same purposes as are the southern pines (Pinus spp.).

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Parana Pine (Araucaria angustifolia)

Parana Pine is an imported softwood

Location

The wood commonly called parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia) is a softwood but not a true pine. It grows in southeastern Brazil and adjacent areas of Paraguay and Argentina.

Characteristics

Parana pine has many desirable characteristics. It is available in large-size clear boards with uniform texture. The small pinhead knots (leaf traces) that appear on flat-sawn surfaces and the light or reddish-brown heartwood provide a desirable figure for matching in paneling and interior woodwork. Growth rings are fairly distinct and similar to those of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). The grain is not interlocked, and the wood takes paint well, glues easily, and is free from resin ducts, pitch pockets, and pitch streaks. Density of air-dried wood averages 545 kg/m3 (34 lb/ft3). The strength of parana pine compares favorably with that of U.S. softwood species of similar density and, in some cases, approaches that of species with higher density. Parana pine is especially strong in shear strength, hardness, and nail-holding ability, but it is notably deficient in strength in compression across the grain. The tendency of the kiln-dried wood to split and warp is caused by the presence of compression wood, an abnormal type of wood with intrinsically large shrinkage along the grain. Boards containing compression wood should be excluded from exacting uses.

Primary Uses

The principal uses of parana pine include framing lumber, interior woodwork, sashes and door stock, furniture case goods, and veneer.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-softwood

Cypress, Mexican (Cupressus lusitanica)

Cypress, Mexican is an imported softwood

Location

Native to Mexico and Guatemala, Mexican cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) is now widely planted at high elevations throughout the tropical world.

Characteristics

The heartwood is yellowish, pale brown, or pinkish, with occasional streaking or variegation. The texture is fine and uniform, and the grain is usually straight. The wood is fragrantly scented. The density of air-dried wood is 512 kg/m3 (32 lb/ft3), and the strength is comparable with that of yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) or western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). The wood is easy to work with hand and machine tools, and it nails, stains, and polishes well. Mexican cypress air dries very rapidly with little or no end- or surface-checking. Reports on durability are conflicting. The heartwood is not treatable by the open tank process and seems to have an irregular response to pressure- vacuum systems.

Primary Uses

Mexican cypress is used mainly for posts and poles, furniture components, and general construction.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Wallaba (Eperua)

Wallaba is an imported hardwood

Location

Wallaba is a common name applied to the species in the genus Eperua. Other names include wapa and apa. The center of distribution is in the Guianas, but the species extends into Venezuela and the Amazon region of northern Brazil. Wallaba generally occurs in pure stands or as the dominant tree in the forest.

Characteristics

The heartwood ranges from light to dark red to reddish or purplish brown with characteristically dark, gummy streaks. The texture is rather coarse and the grain typically straight. Wallaba is a hard, heavy wood; density of air-dried wood is 928 kg/m3 (58 lb/ft3). Its strength is higher than that of shagbark hickory (Carya ovata). The wood dries very slowly with a marked tendency to check, split, and warp. Although the wood has high density, it is easy to work with hand and machine tools. However, the high gum content clogs sawteeth and cutters. Once the wood has been kiln dried, gum exudates are not a serious problem in machining. The heartwood is reported to be very durable and resistant to subterranean termites and fairly resistant to dry-wood termites.

Primary Uses

Wallaba is well suited for heavy construction, railroad crossties, poles, industrial flooring, and tank staves. It is also highly favored for charcoal

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Tornillo (Cedrelinga cateniformis)

Tornillo is an imported hardwood

Location

Tornillo (Cedrelinga cateniformis), also referred to as cedrorana. Other trade and local names**: cedrorana, iacaica, paric , yacayac (BR), tornillo (PE). Tornillo timber is not protected under CITES regulations.
It grows in the Loreton Huanuco provinces of Peru and in the humid terra firma of the Brazilian Amazon region. Tornillo can grow up to 52.5 m (160 ft) tall, with trunk diameters of 1.5 to 3 m (5 to 9 ft). Trees in Peru are often smaller in diameter, with merchantable heights of 15 m (45 ft) or more.

Characteristics

The heartwood is pale brown with a golden luster and prominently marked with red vessel lines; the heartwood gradually merges into the lighter-colored sapwood. The texture is coarse. The density of air-dried material collected in Brazil averages 640 kg/m3 (40 lb/ft3); for Peruvian stock, average density is about 480 kg/m3 (30 lb/ft3). The wood is comparable in strength with American elm (Ulmus americana). Tornillo cuts easily and can be finished smoothly, but areas of tension wood may result in woolly surfaces. The heartwood is fairly durable and reported to have good resistance to weathering.

Primary Uses

Tornillo is a general construction wood that can be used for furniture components in lower-grade furniture.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.**http://delta-intkey.com/wood/en/www/mimcecat.htm

Categories
imported-hardwood

Teak (Tectona grandis)

Teak is an imported hardwood

Location

Teak (Tectona grandis) occurs in commercial quantities in India, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, North and South Vietnam, and the East Indies. Numerous plantations have been developed within its natural range and in tropical areas of Latin America and Africa, and many of these are now producing teakwood.

Characteristics

The heartwood varies from yellow-brown to dark golden- brown and eventually turns a rich brown upon exposure to air. Teakwood has a coarse uneven texture (ring porous), is usually straight grained, and has a distinctly oily feel. The heartwood has excellent dimensional stability and a very high degree of natural durability. Although teak is not generally used in the United States where strength is of prime importance, its properties are generally on par with those of U.S. oaks (Quercus). Teak is generally worked with moderate ease with hand and machine tools. However, the presence of silica often dulls tools. Finishing and gluing are satisfactory, although pretreatment may be necessary to ensure good bonding of finishes and glues.

Primary Uses

Teak is one of the most valuable woods, but its use is limited by scarcity and high cost. Because teak does not cause rust or corrosion when in contact with metal, it is extremely useful in the shipbuilding industry, for tanks and vats, and for fixtures that require high acid resistance. Teak is currently used in the construction of boats, furniture, flooring, decorative objects, and decorative veneer.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Sucupira

Sucupira is an imported hardwood

Location

Sucupira, angelin, and para-angelim apply to species in four genera of legumes from South America. Sucupira applies to Bowdichia nitida from northern Brazil, B. virgilioides from Venezuela, the Guianas, and Brazil, and Diplotropis purpurea from the Guianas and southern Brazil. Angelin (Andira inermis) is a widespread species that occurs throughout the West Indies and from southern Mexico through Central America to northern South America and Brazil. Para-angelim (Hymenolobium excelsum) is generally restricted to Brazil.

Characteristics

The heartwood of sucupira is chocolate-brown, red-brown, or light brown (especially in Diplotropis purpurea). Angelin heartwood is yellowish brown to dark reddish brown; paraangelim heartwood turns pale brown upon exposure to air. The sapwood is generally yellowish to whitish and is sharply demarcated from the heartwood. The texture of all three woods is coarse and uneven, and the grain can be interlocked. The density of air-dried wood of these species ranges from 720 to 960 kg/m3 (45 to 60 lb/ft3), which makes them generally heavier than true hickory (Carya). Their strength properties are also higher than those of true hickory. The heartwood is rated very durable to durable in resistance to decay fungi but only moderately resistant to attack by drywood termites. Angelin is reported to be difficult to treat with preservatives, but para-angelim and sucupira treat adequately. Angelin can be sawn and worked fairly well, except that it is difficult to plane to a smooth surface because of alternating hard (fibers) and soft (parenchyma) tissue. Paraangelim works well in all operations. Sucupira is difficult to moderately difficult to work because of its high density, irregular grain, and coarse texture.

Primary Uses

Sucupira, angelin, and para-angelim are ideal for heavy construction, railroad crossties, and other uses that do not require much fabrication. Other suggested uses include flooring, boat building, furniture, turnery, tool handles, and decorative veneer.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Spanish-Cedar (Cedrela)

Spanish-Cedar is an imported hardwood

Location

Spanish-cedar or cedro consists of a group of about seven species in the genus Cedrela that are widely distributed in tropical America from southern Mexico to northern Argentina.

Characteristics

Spanish-cedar is one of only a few tropical species that are ring-porous. The heartwood varies from light to dark reddish brown, and the sapwood is pinkish to white. The texture is rather fine and uniform to coarse and uneven. The grain is not interlocked. The heartwood is characterized by a distinctive odor. The wood dries easily. Although Spanish-cedar is not high in strength, most other properties are similar to those of American mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), except for hardness and compression perpendicular to the grain, where mahogany is definitely superior. Spanish-cedar is considered decay resistant; it works and glues well. Spanish-cedar is used locally for all purposes that require an easily worked, light but straight grained, and durable wood.

Primary Uses

In the United States, the wood is favored for millwork, cabinets, fine furniture, boat building, cigar wrappers and boxes, humidores, and decorative and utility plywood.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Seraya, White (Parashorea)

Seraya, White is an imported hardwood

Location

White seraya or bagtikan, as it is called in the Philippines, is a name applied to the 14 species of Parashorea, which grow in Sabah and the Philippines.

Characteristics

The heartwood is light brown or straw-colored, sometimes with a pinkish tint. The texture is moderately coarse and the grain interlocked. White seraya is very similar in appearance and strength properties to light red meranti, and sometimes the two are mixed in the market. White seraya dries easily with little degrade, and works fairly well with hand and machine tools. The heartwood is not durable to moderately durable in ground contact, and it is extremely resistant to preservative treatments.

Primary Uses

White seraya is used for joinery, light construction, moulding and millwork, flooring, plywood, furniture, and cabinet work.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.