Categories
imported-hardwood

Rosewood, Indian (Dalbergia latifolia)

Rosewood, Indian is an imported hardwood

Location

Indian rosewood (Dalbergia latifolia) is native to most provinces of India except in the northwest.

Characteristics

The heartwood varies in color from golden brown to dark purplish brown with denser blackish streaks at the end of growth zones, giving rise to an attractive figure on flat-sawn surfaces. The narrow sapwood is yellowish. The average weight is about 849 kg/m3 (53 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. The texture is uniform and moderately coarse. Indian rosewood is quite similar in appearance to Brazilian (Dalbergia nigra) and Honduran (Dalbergia stevensonii) rosewood. The wood is reported to kiln-dry well though slowly, and the color improves during drying. Indian rosewood is a heavy wood with high strength properties; after drying, it is particularly hard for its weight. The wood is moderately hard to work with hand tools and offers a fair resistance in machine operations. Lumber with calcareous deposits tends to dull tools rapidly. The wood turns well and has high screw-holding properties. If a very smooth surface is required for certain purposes, pores (vessels) may need to be filled.

Primary Uses

Indian rosewood is essentially a decorative wood for high quality furniture and cabinetwork. In the United States, it is used primarily in the form of veneer.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Rosewood, Brazilian (Dalbergia nigra)

Rosewood, Brazilian is an imported hardwood

Location

Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra), also referred to as jacaranda, occurs in eastern Brazilian forests from the State of Bahia to Rio de Janeiro. Since it was exploited for a long time, Brazilian rosewood is no longer abundant.

Characteristics

The heartwood varies with respect to color, through shades of brown, red, and violet, and it is irregularly and conspicuously streaked with black. It is sharply demarcated from the white sapwood. Many kinds of rosewood are distinguished locally on the basis of prevailing color. The texture is coarse, and the grain is generally straight. The heartwood has an oily or waxy appearance and feel, and its odor is fragrant and distinctive. The wood is hard and heavy (weight of airdried wood is 752 to 897 kg/m3 (47 to 56 lb/ft3)); thoroughly air-dried wood will barely float in water. Strength properties of Brazilian rosewood are high and are more than adequate for the purposes for which this wood is used. For example, Brazilian rosewood is harder than any U.S. native hardwood species used for furniture and veneer. The wood machines and veneers well. It can be glued satisfactorily, provided the necessary precautions are taken to ensure good glue bonds, with respect to oily wood. Brazilian rosewood has an excellent reputation for durability with respect to fungal and insect attack, including termites, although the wood is not used for purposes where durability is necessary.

Primary Uses

Brazilian rosewood is used primarily in the form of veneer for decorative plywood. Limited quantities are used in the solid form for specialty items such as cutlery handles, brush backs, billiard cue butts, and fancy turnery.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Roble (Tabebuia)

Roble is an imported hardwood

Location

Roble, a species in the roble group of Tabebuia (generally T. rosea), ranges from southern Mexico through Central America to Venezuela and Ecuador. The name roble comes from the Spanish word for oak (Quercus). In addition, T. rosea is called roble because the wood superficially resembles U.S. oak. Other names for T. rosea are mayflower and apamate.

Characteristics

The sapwood becomes a pale brown upon exposure to air. The heartwood varies from golden brown to dark brown, and it has no distinctive odor or taste. The texture is medium and the grain narrowly interlocked. The wood weighs about 642 kg/m3 (40 lb/ft3) at 12% moisture content. Roble has excellent working properties in all machine operations. It finishes attractively in natural color and takes finishes with good results. It weighs less than the average of U.S. white oaks (Quercus) but is comparable with respect to bending and compression parallel to grain. The heartwood of roble is generally rated as moderately to very durable with respect to decay; the darker and heavier wood is regarded as more resistant than the lighter-colored woods.

Primary Uses

Roble is used extensively for furniture, interior woodwork, doors, flooring, boat building, ax handles, and general construction. The wood veneers well and produces attractive paneling. For some applications, roble is suggested as a substitute for American white ash (Fraxinus americana) and oak (Quercus).

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Ramin (Gonystylus bancanus)

Ramin is an imported hardwood

Location

Ramin (Gonystylus bancanus) is native to southeast Asia from the Malaysian Peninsula to Sumatra and Borneo.

Characteristics

Both the heartwood and sapwood are the color of pale straw, yellow, or whitish. The grain is straight or shallowly interlocked. The texture is even, moderately fine, and similar to that of American mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla). The wood is without figure or luster. Ramin is moderately hard and heavy, weighing about 672 kg/m3 (42 lb/ft3) in the airdried condition. The wood is easy to work, finishes well, and glues satisfactorily. Ramin is rated as not resistant to decay but permeable with respect to preservative treatment.

Primary Uses

Ramin is used for plywood, interior woodwork, furniture, turnery, joinery, moulding, flooring, dowels, and handles of nonstriking tools (brooms), and as a general utility wood.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Purpleheart (Peltogyne)

Purpleheart is an imported hardwood

Location

Purpleheart, also referred to as amaranth, is the name applied to species in the genus Peltogyne. The center of distribution is in the north-central part of the Brazilian Amazon region, but the combined range of all species is from Mexico through Central America and southward to southern Brazil.

Characteristics

Freshly cut heartwood is brown. It turns a deep purple upon exposure to air and eventually dark brown upon exposure to light. The texture is medium to fine, and the grain is usually straight. This strong and heavy wood (density of air-dried wood is 800 to 1,057 kg/m3 (50 to 66 lb/ft3)) is rated as easy to moderately difficult to air dry. It is moderately difficult to work with using either hand or machine tools, and it dulls cutters rather quickly. Gummy resin exudes when the wood is heated by dull tools. A slow feed rate and specially hardened cutters are suggested for optimal cutting. The wood turns easily, is easy to glue, and takes finishes well. The heartwood is rated as highly resistant to attack by decay fungi and very resistant to dry-wood termites. It is extremely resistant to treatment with preservatives.

Primary Uses

The unusual and unique color of purpleheart makes this wood desirable for turnery, marquetry, cabinets, fine furniture, parquet flooring, and many specialty items, such as billiard cue butts and carvings. Other uses include heavy construction, shipbuilding, and chemical vats.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Primavera (Tabebuia donnell- smithii)

Primavera is an imported hardwood

Location

The natural distribution of primavera (Tabebuia donnell-smithii [=Cybistax donnell-smithii]) is restricted to southwestern Mexico, the Pacific coast of Guatemala and El Salvador, and north-central Honduras. Primavera is regarded as one of the primary light-colored woods, but its use has been limited because of its rather restricted range and relative scarcity of naturally grown trees. Recent plantations have increased the availability of this species and have provided a more constant source of supply. The quality of the plantation- grown wood is equal in all respects to the wood obtained from naturally grown trees.

Characteristics

The heartwood is whitish to straw-yellow, and in some logs, it may be tinted with pale brown or pinkish streaks. The texture is medium to rather coarse, and the grain is straight to wavy, which produces a wide variety of figure patterns. The wood also has a very high luster. Shrinkage is rather low, and the wood shows a high degree of dimensional stability. Despite considerable grain variation, primavera machines remarkably well. The density of air-dried wood is 465 kg/m3 (29 lb/ft3), and the wood is comparable in strength with water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica). Resistance to both brown- and white-rot fungi varies. Weathering characteristics are good.

Primary Uses

The dimensional stability, ease of working, and pleasing appearance make primavera a suitable choice for solid furniture, paneling, interior woodwork, and special exterior uses.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Piquia (Caryocar)

Piquia is an imported hardwood

Location

Piquia is the common name generally applied to species in the genus Caryocar. This genus is distributed from Costa Rica southward into northern Colombia and from the upland forest of the Amazon valley to eastern Brazil and the Guianas.

Characteristics

The yellowish to light grayish brown heartwood is hardly distinguishable from the sapwood. The texture is medium to rather coarse, and the grain is generally interlocked. The wood dries at a slow rate; warping and checking may develop, but only to a minor extent. Piquia is reported to be easy to moderately difficult to saw; cutting edges dull rapidly. The heartwood is very durable and resistant to decay fungi and dry-wood termites but only moderately resistant to marine borers.

Primary Uses

Piquia is recommended for general and marine construction, heavy flooring, railway crossties, boat parts, and furniture components. It is especially suitable where hardness and high wear resistance are needed.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Pilon (Hyeronima alchorneoides and H. laxiflora)

Pilon is an imported hardwood

Location

The two main species of pilon are Hyeronima alchorneoides and H. laxiflora, also referred to as suradan. These species range from southern Mexico to southern Brazil including the Guianas, Peru, and Colombia. Pilon species are also found throughout the West Indies.

Characteristics

The heartwood is a light reddish brown to chocolate brown or sometimes dark red; the sapwood is pinkish white. The texture is moderately coarse and the grain interlocked. The wood air-dries rapidly with only a moderate amount of warp and checking. It has good working properties in all operations except planing, which is rated poor as a result of the characteristic interlocked grain. The strength of pilon is comparable with that of true hickory (Carya), and the density of air-dried wood ranges from 736 to 849 kg/m3 (46 to 53 lb/ft3). Pilon is rated moderately to very durable in ground contact and resistant to moderately resistant to subterranean and dry-wood termites. Both heartwood and sapwood are reported to be treatable with preservatives by both open tank and pressure vacuum processes.

Primary Uses

Pilon is especially suited for heavy construction, railway crossties, marinework, and flooring. It is also used for furniture, cabinetwork, decorative veneers, turnery, and joinery.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Peroba Rosa (Aspidosperma)

Peroba Rosa is an imported hardwood

Location

Peroba rosa is the common name applied to a number of similar species in the genus Aspidosperma. These species occur in southeastern Brazil and parts of Argentina.

Characteristics

The heartwood is a distinctive rose-red to yellowish, often variegated or streaked with purple or brown, and becomes brownish yellow to dark brown upon exposure to air; the heartwood is often not demarcated from the yellowish sapwood. The texture is fine and uniform, and the grain is straight to irregular. The wood is moderately heavy; weight of air-dried wood is 752 kg/m3 (47 lb/ft3). Strength properties are comparable with those of U.S. oak (Quercus). The wood dries with little checking or splitting. It works with moderate ease, and it glues and finishes satisfactorily. The heartwood is resistant to decay fungi but susceptible to dry-wood termite attack. Although the sapwood takes preservative treatment moderately well, the heartwood resists treatment.

Primary Uses

Peroba is suited for general construction work and is favored for fine furniture and cabinetwork and decorative veneers. Other uses include flooring, interior woodwork, sashes and doors, and turnery.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.

Categories
imported-hardwood

Peroba de Campos (Paratecoma peroba)

Peroba de Campos is an imported hardwood

Location

Peroba de campos (Paratecoma peroba), also referred to as white peroba, grows in the coastal forests of eastern Brazil, ranging from Bahia to Rio de Janeiro. It is the only species in the genus Paratecoma.

Characteristics

The heartwood varies in color but is generally shades of brown with tendencies toward olive and red. The sapwood is a yellowish gray and is clearly defined from the heartwood. The texture is relatively fine and approximates that of birch (Betula). The grain is commonly interlocked, with a narrow stripe or wavy figure. The wood machines easily; however, particular care must be taken in planing to prevent excessive grain tearing of quartered surfaces. There is some evidence that the fine dust from machining operations may produce allergic responses in certain individuals. Density of air-dried wood averages about 738 kg/m3 (46 lb/ft3). Peroba de campos is heavier than teak (Tectona grandis) or white oak (Quercus alba), and it is proportionately stronger than either of these species. The heartwood of peroba de campos is rated as very durable with respect to decay and difficult to treat with preservatives.

Primary Uses

In Brazil, peroba de campos is used in the manufacture of fine furniture, flooring, and decorative paneling. The principal use in the United States is shipbuilding, where peroba de campos serves as substitute for white oak (Quercus alba) for all purposes except bent members.

*Much of the base wood information presented here is made available by the USDA FPL FS. If you are interested in a much more technical description of wood properties, I encourage you to visit the source.